Tag Archives: storm

Feeling the Storm

In Scotland yesterday it was unusually hot. The wind here is generally cool or cold on your skin, but for once it was like a tropical bath. Our bus stopped for a small group of people who took their time buying tickets. The sun burning through the windows became intense. Heatstroke started to seem like a real possibility, and when we finally got moving again, fresh air circulated through the bus and everyone breathed a sigh of relief. I didn’t think we could take many such hold-ups.

When we got to town, there were queues in shops where there are normally few people; tourists and locals ‘enjoying’ a day out. It’s odd when you think about it — shopping is the least fun thing to do when you’d rather sit in the shade with an ice lolly.

According to weather reports we were heading for thunderstorms, so it wasn’t surprising when the sky started lighting up that night. At 2 a.m. when everyone was in bed, the menace was profound… ancient forces were stalking the land. Like mice, we lay quiet in our lonely burrows, hoping to escape the attention of something much bigger than us.

Lamp switched off; curtains closed; all I could see was the repeated repulsing of outer darkness. A picture formed in my mind of houses huddled across the curve of the earth. Nothing dared go abroad while the storm stepped overhead with stately imperiousness. It was all very old and powerful, and I could imagine dinosaurs in the streets and in open fields, hoary heads swinging, on the hunt for prey.

In the midst of all this I started worrying about the sunflower.

It normally sits in the kitchen window but was crawling with aphids. I didn’t want the little horrors to spread to my chillis, so put the sunflower out for the night. Standing on the doorstep, I belatedly remembered the snails, and put the pot on the top shelf of a tall garden what-not which was standing beside the back door. Above my head, the sunflower stabbed the night with its loathsome burden of greenfly.

Now, in my darkened room, I had visions of this slender green rod attracting lightning. The aphids would burn up, which would be great… but, less happily, so would the sunflower. I could get up and move it to ground level, but told myself not to be so stupid. After all, the house is taller than the sunflower… if there’s any stray lightning around, it’s more likely to hit the roof.

Being all too aware of aforementioned ancient forces, you have no wish to stir out of bed. I didn’t want to be found on the doorstep the next morning as a small pile of ash covered in slime trails, so the sunflower would have to take its chances.

Lying in bed, not sleeping, you still worry.

The cats were indoors and in their beds, probably as glad about that as I was. Was everything unplugged? I reassured myself I was unlikely to be zapped and there was nothing I could do to make it less likely, while probably a lot I could do to make it more likely… then was disturbed by a memory. Something happened on a night like this years ago.

That other night, I lay awake with frequent flashes of lightning punctuating the darkness. The rain came down so hard it bounced off the tarmac. Suddenly there was a crash, causing me to leap up and run around to see if anything had blown up. It wasn’t till next day I found the aerial booster had stopped working, though the TV itself was fine! Ha.

I said there was a crash that night, but it’s not that simple. I’m profoundly deaf. I only know I started to my feet all of a sudden, and it wasn’t out of panic… it was because some internal alert had gone off abruptly, as yours would if there was a loud bang in your house.

Fortunately last night was uneventful. It rained, the sunflower fell off its perch and the aphids disappeared. There was thunder I couldn’t hear, which lacks all drama — yet I knew something big had passed.

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Cloudburst

Well I did ask for this. “More rain, please” I begged, as I watched the grass go yellow and the duck pond disappearing. Only two days ago I passed the pond to check its progress, and it was still drawing away from the rim. The mud at the bottom was exposed, and there was a Stella Artois bottle stuck in it, neck first. I thought of wading out to get it but didn’t want to get muddy – I would probably slip and fall straight into what was left of the pond, and then die of some obscure scummy disease. Why must people drop their rubbish? They do it out of sheer spite now, but maybe one day they’ll stop and look around, and realize they live here too.

Or perhaps they’ll never realize it. They will forever imagine they live in someone else’s world.

It was damp and cool yesterday, but today when I set off to walk Thundercloud, I only got about 5 minutes away from my house when the heavens opened. I was warned by some very large spots of rain and dug out my umbrella from my wheelie bag. By the time the umbrella was open, the rain was slashing down in a fury, and the wind tried to bash the metal frame against my face and twist it out of shape. It cut sideways and got me wet anyway, so I turned round and hurried home. I don’t mind rain normally, but I had no particular desire to experience that all the way to Thundercloud’s house and back, with the dog walk itself in the middle.

So, no dog walk.